Taxonomy term

equine Diarrhea, winter diarrhea Horses, Equine Digestion, chronic horse diarrhea, equine Diarrhea

During the switch to a 100 percent hay diet in the fall of the year is when many horse owners first notice that some of their horses are getting loose manure. The situation can quickly evolve into a management mess where one or more horses are so loose they can spray fecal material on the walls of the stall when they pass manure. Winter grooming becomes a major challenge for those who care for these horses as they struggle to keep tails, hocks, fetlocks, and equine clothing clean and free of encrusted manure.

shelagh niblock horse nutrition, horse's diet ppid, equine cushings disease, tying up horse, metabolic conditions horse, pssm type 1 and 2 horses

Receiving a diagnosis of the condition behind your horse’s health or performance problem is usually a relief, but the satisfaction of getting the diagnosis can be quickly replaced by fear and uncertainty regarding what to do about it. Questions around both the long-term prospects for your horse and the costs involved to support the horse with such a condition can be daunting. Owners of horses diagnosed with special nutritional needs often feel bewildered and frustrated as they attempt to put together an appropriate management protocol.

horse colic, equine colic, colic surgery, western college of veterinary medicine, wcvm

Symptoms, Treatment and Prevention - Most horse owners have their own personal stories to tell about colic — but chances are that everyone’s tales about the dreaded disease are different. Episodes of colic can range from a mild case of abdominal pain that resolves with pain medications to a life-threatening event that requires emergency surgical treatment. With such a variable condition, it can be difficult for horse owners to determine the right course of action for their horse’s situation, says Dr. Carolina Duran, a resident in large animal internal medicine at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM).

first aid for horses, how to treat a horse wound, should i call a vet horse injured? tetanus booster horse, equine guelph the horse portal

When a horse is injured, it can be a very scary time for owners and handlers, especially if there is blood involved. However, it is important to remain calm when dealing with wounds. Here are five things you should not do when your horse is injured:

equine first aid, travelling with horses, safe trail riding, safe horse riding, safe equine first aid, horse's wounds, how to take a horse's heart rate, take horse temperature, check if a horse hydrated

Almost every owner will have to deal with an equine emergency sooner or later. A horse’s natural curiosity, a trail ride mishap, or turnout with herd mates can lead to all kinds of cuts, bruises, kicks, and bites. Scrapes, stone bruises, punctures, sprains, or sores can happen suddenly, and more serious conditions such as abscesses, colic, or bacterial infections can flare up with no warning.

equine joint disease, arthritis in horses, treating sore joints horses, x rays horse joints, ultrasound horses, diane gibbard

It is estimated that a staggering 60 percent of all equine lameness is due to arthritis and joint disease. One of the biggest challenges is that some arthritic horses might not show signs of lameness when there is damage and inflammation in the joint; therefore, proper prevention and early diagnosis is key to managing the progression of joint disease. There are many potential causes of equine arthritis.

removing ticks from horses, equine guelph, how to get rid of a tick on my horse

Ticks are a nuisance that can often go undetected. Because of the risk of disease transmission (Lyme disease, Anaplasmosis, Equine piroplasmosis), it is important to frequently examine your horse for the presence of ticks, and to take steps to lower risk of exposure.

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