Horse Industry

horse riding holidays canada, vacationing with horses, shawn hamilton, anchor d guiding, bar w guest ranch, brewster adventures, flying u ranch, alberta horse riding, ontario holiday riding

How guest ranches and riding resorts have survived and thrived during the pandemic - It’s been almost a year now since we began dealing with the repercussions of the global pandemic, and we’re not yet anywhere near “business as usual.” No aspect of the horse industry remains untouched. Although some businesses were agile enough to adapt fairly quickly, the livelihood of a guest ranch owner or an outfitter depends on vacationers coming to their location to experience a day or a week in the saddle. Horses cannot simply be parked; they need to be cared for, and wages need to be paid.

equine industry symposium 2021, covid-19 canada's horse industry, university of guelph symposium, canada's horse industry

Resilience: Rethinking, Restructuring, Reevaluating due to COVID-19 - Every year since 2016, University of Guelph equine faculty and students have organized the Equine Industry Symposium to bring together experts and horse enthusiasts from Canada’s equine community and discuss horse industry issues. In 2020, there was only one topic on everyone’s mind: how Canada’s equine industry would make it through the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and what the industry would look like in its aftermath.

equine code of practice, code of practice for the care and handling of equines, shelagh niblock equine nutritionist

What does it mean for Canadian horse owners? Are you aware that a Code of Practice for the Care and Handling of Equines (CPCHE) was published in Canada in 2013? Did you know that Equine Canada, the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA), the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA), and the Canadian Feed Inspection Agency were among the many partners involved in the development of the CPCHE under the National Farm Animal Care Council (NFACC), and that they remain part of the team that supports the industry-recognized recommendations and requirements established within the Code for good equine husbandry? Let’s look at what exactly this equine Code entails.

are school horses good to learn on, what do school horses do, how to start riding a horse, didi  arias

My parents didn’t have a lot of money for my riding lessons, and I know they must have scrimped and saved for my one-hour sessions. Those lessons were the highlight of my week and they held great power over me to stay out of trouble — with one strike I could hear the parental words that put fear into every kid: “Behave or you will be grounded…” and they always finished the sentence with “…and that means NO RIDING.” I behaved.

karen weslowski, legal contracts buying a horse property in canada, what to know when buying a horse property in canada

There is a certain allure to purchasing property. For most people, this means a quaint home, a cute front porch, and a white picket fence. For horse people, this dream is multiplied. We seek limitless green pastures, a barn built for royalty, crisp and clean horse-safe fencing, and more.

how to market horse business, marketing equestrian products, public relations for the horse industry

In our busy world, it’s easy for exciting competition results and new equestrian products to get lost in 24/7 news cycles and an internet slathered with social media posts and click-bait advertising. But connecting with supporters, introducing new products, and staying top-of-mind with potential sponsors, are integral to the success of professional riders and equine businesses. What can riders and horse industry businesses do to ensure their fans, owners, and potential clients, stay engaged? Hiring a public relations professional may be the answer.

didi arias horse rider, covid horse industry, riding horses during pandemic, managing horse farm pandemic

Midway through 2020 was the first giveaway that something was off when I noticed that my days seemed to be ending sooner than they should have, with evening chores, dinner, and bedtime rolling around before I felt I even got started. That was odd because it was summer and our daylight hours here in southern Spain are long. It also seemed that very little progress was being made on my “To Do” list: day after day it was sneering at me, growing longer. Not only was there the feeling of getting little accomplished, I was also forgetful, frequently walking into rooms without remembering why; my cell phone even had a brief stay in the fridge.

Pages

Advertisement

Advertisement

LifeLine Feeds - Made From More - from Otter Co-op