Illness & Injury

senior horses care, older horses weight loss, senior horse feed and nutrition, dental care senior horse

With today’s medical advances, research, and improved management, horses are living longer and longer lives. In the past, most horses were considered old when they reached their late teens. These days, it’s not uncommon for horses to live into their late 20s or even into their 30s, allowing us to spend plenty of quality time with our elder equine friends. Proper management is key to ensuring that the older horse is happy and comfortable throughout his golden years.

feeding senior horse, malnourished senior horse, henneke body condition horse, senior equine teeth

Each horse is an individual and will have their own specific nutritional needs. With that in mind, there are several categories into which seniors can be divided based on their nutritional needs.

equestrian dental care, dentists for horses, dental checkup for horse, horse veterinarians dental, shelagh niblock, how to care for horse's teeth

Much more than just floating teeth! Do you remember to get an annual dental exam for your horse? A dental check by your veterinarian involves floating, the process of filing a horse’s teeth to correct irregularities in the occlusal (biting) surfaces, as well as inspecting the teeth for any indication of a variety of other potential problems. In addition to examining the teeth for abnormalities that might cause chewing and/or bitting issues, your vet will also be looking for signs of fractured or loose teeth, as well as signs of ulceration on the cheek mucosa, the tongue, or the gums (gingiva).

horse colic operation, treatments for colic, equine science update, mark andrews, standing flank laparotomy colic

A recent study has concluded that standing flank laparotomy may be a suitable option for surgical treatment of some cases of equine colic. The standard surgical approach for colic is through an incision in the ventral midline, with the horse under general anaesthesia. General anaesthesia poses additional risks over and above those of the surgery itself, and the personnel and equipment required increase the cost.

research radio equine, equine lameness, why is my horse lame, treatments lame horse, dr. judith koenig

Surgeon, researcher and teacher, OVC Health Science Centre at Ontario Veterinary College, discusses her research into methods of evaluating lameness. (Lameness detection equipment kindly donated by the Equine Foundation of Canada.

jec ballou horse trainer, rehabilitating horses, exercises to help horses, equine lameness rehab, horse postural muscles, grazing horses, equine fitness

Develop an exercise therapy program that gives your horse the best chance of recovery - Subtle lameness or signs of pain that do not lead to a clear veterinary diagnosis can be extremely frustrating, costly, and time-consuming. Unfortunately, they are also quite common, leaving many owners feeling helpless to plot a path forward. In this article I will offer guiding principles for tackling these scenarios along with specific examples of how I implemented them with Remy, a mare that came to me with bucking behaviours and signs of back pain but with no clear diagnosis.

colic surgery horses, rehabilitation horse, dr. crystal lee, burwash equine, exercises for equine rehabilitaion, books on horse rehab

One of the many reasons that the words “colic surgery” tend to strike fear into a horse owner’s heart is the question of whether their horse will be able to return to their previous level of performance (or even return to performing at all). A recent research study by Dr. Holcombe and her team at Michigan State University looked at specific ways that a horse owner can influence the likelihood of this return to performance after colic surgery (1).

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