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ehv-1 research, ontario veterinary college research, horse infection control, virus isolation horses, equine guelph

“Most horses have been exposed to the equine herpesvirus,” says Dr. Diego Gomez-Nieto, researcher at the Ontario Veterinary College. Gomez has been part of a research study on the equine herpesvirus (EHV) which discovered the nasal microbiota of infected horses differed significantly from those of a healthy control group. The study came together quickly and was conducted on a horse farm in Ontario that was experiencing an outbreak. The January 2021 research paper explains nasal bacterial microbiota of healthy horses is richer and more diverse than previously reported using culture-based methodology.

types of flexural limb deformity foal, abnormal foal fetal development, foal malnutrition diseases, uc davic center for equine health

Flexural limb deformity occurs in two forms. The first form, also known as contracted tendons, clubfoot, or knuckling, is the inability to extend a limb fully. The condition may be present at birth (congenital) due to improper positioning in the uterus (which can lead to dystocia in the mare), abnormal fetal development, disease or malnutrition in the dam; or acquired as the result of nutrition (abrupt changes in amount or quality of feed leading to rapid growth), polyarthritis, trauma, or disease. It is a common condition in foals, usually occurring anytime from birth to 14 months of age.

equine emergency preparedness, horses stuck flooding, preventing barn fire, emergency services horses, help for horses disaster, kevan garecki, bc flooding horses

There’s Far More To It Than You Might Think - My wife and I recently spent four devastating days in Sumas Prairie, Abbotsford, British Columbia assisting with the rescue and evacuation of animals following the disastrous flooding caused by the “atmospheric river” of torrential rain in mid-November 2021. It’s one thing to watch it on the news — it’s surreal to be on the ground in the middle of it.

cryptosporidiosis horses, gastrointestinal diseases foals, horses gastrointestinal disease, sick foal, parasites in horses, uc davis center for equine health

Commonly seen in young foals, this infection can be fatal if left untreated. Parasites in the genus Cryptosporidium are an important source of gastrointestinal disease in humans and animals globally. These highly contagious parasites infect the intestine and cause diarrhea and weight loss.

equine rotavirus, foal diarrhea, diseases in foals, uc davis center for equine health, horse elisa test

A common cause of diarrhea in foals less than six months old. Equine rotavirus damages the lining of the intestines, inhibiting digestion and absorption of food. It is one of the most common causes of diarrhea in foals less than six months of age. Foals become infected when they ingest materials or lick surfaces contaminated with infected feces.

equestrian dental care, dentists for horses, dental checkup for horse, horse veterinarians dental, shelagh niblock, how to care for horse's teeth

Much more than just floating teeth! Do you remember to get an annual dental exam for your horse? A dental check by your veterinarian involves floating, the process of filing a horse’s teeth to correct irregularities in the occlusal (biting) surfaces, as well as inspecting the teeth for any indication of a variety of other potential problems. In addition to examining the teeth for abnormalities that might cause chewing and/or bitting issues, your vet will also be looking for signs of fractured or loose teeth, as well as signs of ulceration on the cheek mucosa, the tongue, or the gums (gingiva).

dr chantal pinard, research radio equine guelph, equine eye care, eye care for horses

Source: Research Radio by Equine Guelph | with Dr. Chantal Pinard 

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